Airbrushing Religion

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by Fr. George Rutler  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  May 19, 2019   

Fr. George Rutler on the film Tolkien

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In recent weeks, long lines streamed into the Morgan Library to see a display of J.R.R. Tolkien's memorabilia and his art, mostly drawings and watercolors. Other authors like William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor sketched as an avocation, but these pictures were very much an integral part of Tolkien's symbolic world in The Lord of the RingsThe Hobbit and The Silmarillion.

Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem.

Here on display was an example of the words inscribed as John Henry Newman's epitaph: Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem — "Into the truth through shadows and images." When Tolkien's widowed mother converted to Catholicism in 1900, she was disinherited by her Baptist family. She died at the age of 34, before the invention of insulin, when Tolkien was 12 and his brother 10. He would write that his mother "killed herself with labour and trouble to ensure us keeping the faith." The devout Oratorian priest to whom Mabel entrusted her boys, Fr. Francis Xavier Morgan, had been a schoolboy under the tutelage of Newman, soon to be canonized.


 

To his dying day, Tolkien was a daily communicant and venerated the memory of Fr. Morgan (no relation to J.P.), whom he had served as an altar boy, leading many others to the Faith, and he married only after persuading his future wife to convert. His grandson Simon has recalled that during the liturgical changes following Vatican II, his grandfather "didn't agree with this and made all the responses very loudly in Latin while the rest of the congregation answered in English. I found the whole experience quite excruciating, but my grandfather was oblivious. He simply had to do what he believed to be right."

A new "biopic" about Tolkien's early years features Fr. Morgan at the start, near the middle and at the end, but practically omits any other mention of the Catholicism that was at the heart of the author's life as an Oxford don and writer. The film originally had a scene showing Tolkien receiving Communion in the trenches during the First World War, but it was cut because "people felt it was boring."

The film practically omits any other mention of the Catholicism that was at the heart of the author's life.

Last year's film of the children's book A Wrinkle in Time, produced with Disney Corporation money (like Tolkien, which was made through the Disney-owned Fox Searchlight), eliminated the Christian imagery of its author, Madeleine L'Engle. Perhaps if it had been faithful to the text, it would not have lost nearly $100 million.

Madeleine was a good friend, and I knew to a lesser degree Tolkien's eldest son John, who was a priest. Both would have found the film producers' airbrushing of religion utterly incomprehensible. Tolkien wrote to the daughter of his publisher: "the chief purpose of life, for any one of us, is to increase according to our capacity our knowledge of God by all the means we have, and to be moved by it to praise and thanks."

Father George W. Rutler is pastor of St. Michael the Archangel Church in the archdiocese of New York. His Sunday homilies can be heard here. Father Rutler is author of multiple books, including Calm in Chaos: Catholic Wisdom in Anxious Times, and his latest book, Grace and Truth. To make a donation to his parish, please click this link.

 

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