Alpha Offers Protestantized Christ

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by Bradley Eli, M.Div., Ma.Th.  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  December 5, 2017   

Matthew 16:15: "But whom do you say that I am?"

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The Alpha program as used by U.S. bishops never answers the question of who Christ really is. It does, however, speak of Christ in terms of sociology and psychology with a protestantized veneer of Christianity.

In episode two of the Alpha series titled, Who is Jesus, Nicky Gumbel, the Anglican host and producer of the series, quotes from John 6:35 where Jesus says, "I am the bread of life." His explanation of this passage includes only that Our Lord satisfies us in ways that the world can't. His discussion is a continuation of his overriding Protestant theme which is to have some quasi-personal relationship with Jesus.

Christ first asked the apostles in Matthew 16:13–15, "Whom do men say that the Son of man is?" In the series, Gumbel continually answers Our Lord's question in Protestant fashion. Christ goes on to say, "But whom do you say that I am?" Even the so-called Catholic version of Gumbel's Alpha Program leaves that question untouched.

Never once in the entire 16 session of Alpha will you hear that Christ is the Eucharist, Who in John 6:54–56 said:

Amen, amen I say unto you: Except you eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink his blood, you shall not have life in you. He that eats my flesh and drinks my blood has everlasting life: and I will raise him up in the last day. For my flesh is meat indeed: and my blood is drink indeed. He that eats my flesh, and drinks my blood, abides in me, and I in him.

Watch the panel discuss the dangers of using Protestantism as a tool for evangelization in The Download—Alpha.
 

 

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