CRS and Funding for Contraception-Pushers

News: Crisis in the Church
by Church Militant  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  June 29, 2016   

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By Michael Hichborn

Since February, the Lepanto Institute has published a series of articles exposing the financial partnerships formed by Catholic Relief Services, through grants provided by the federal government. The fact of the matter is that CRS would not have any reason to partner with any of these organizations were it not for the fact that the federal government makes such partnerships a requirement for obtaining these grants. Our first article revisited funding CRS has funneled to Population Services International, an organization that was created by a pornographer for the specific purpose of population control. Our next article focused on CRS' funds for a condom-distributing organization called Africare. We then illustrated the odd disconnect between a decision made by the archbishop of St. Louis to distance the archdiocese away from the Girl Scouts because of its relationship with OXFAM ... and Catholic Relief Services' continued funding for OXFAM, where there is no public rebuke by any bishop. Our last article on this matter discussed how CRS introduced sheep to wolves through its work with CARE International, the Adventist Relief Agency, and ACDI/VOCA.

We're working on profiling the rest of the bad actors receiving pass-through funding from Catholic Relief Services and will have a complete list finished soon. In the meantime, this article will focus on two more contraception-pushing groups that CRS is working with, hand-in-glove.

ChildFund International

Childfund 01

For fiscal year 2014, Catholic Relief Services provided $564,424 to ChildFund International, an organization that distributes abortifacient, injectable contraception and condoms.

Childfund 02According to a 2011 document co-authored by USAID, FHI 360, Progress in Family Planning, and ChildFund International, Childfund approached FHI 360 to ask about collaborating on a project to start distributing injectable contraception called "Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate" (DMPA), which is marketed under the brand name "Depo-Provera." Page eight of the document, which is titled "Expanding Community Based Access to Injectable Contraception," says: "In November 2008, ChildFund Zambia asked FHI 360 (formerly named Family Health International) to collaborate on a pilot study to introduce injectable contraceptives to its existing CBD (community based distribution) program."

In 2009, ChildFund and FHI 360 began training local community-based distributors in the method of injecting the contraceptive, disposal of the syringes, and counseling women on possible side effects. By February of 2010, CBDs were administering DMPA unsupervised.

In 2011, a pro-abortion, contraception-promoting organization called Women Deliver produced a list of what it calls the "top 50 inspiring ideas and solutions that deliver for girls and women." Listed at number 9, Women Deliver applauded ChildFund International for "targeted pilot programs for community-based distribution of specific interventions, such as misoprostol," which is an abortion-inducing drug.

Childfund 03

For additional details on Childfund International, please read the full report on this organization here.

D-Tree International

d.tree 01

For fiscal year 2014, CRS provided $106,184 to D-Tree International. D-Tree International was founded by a strident advocate for the widespread use of contraception among the poor in the developing world. To that specific end and under its founder's direction, D-Tree created a mobile phone application that increases the use and distribution of artificial contraception.

Read the rest at the Lepanto Institute.

 

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