God in the Skies

News: Video Reports
by Bradley Eli, M.Div., Ma.Th.  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  April 1, 2020   

Come down from Heaven and save us

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TRANSCRIPT

Christ is being taken to the skies as the Wuhan virus takes its toll on the world, infecting more than 800 thousand and killing close to 40 thousand more.

Michigan priest Fr. Mark Rutherford ascended to the heavens with Our Lord in a single-engine plane on three-hour eucharistic procession on March 21, blessing the entire diocese of Lansing.

Fr. Rutherford: "This procession around the diocese is to ask our Heavenly Father to heal us of the COVID, to heal all those who currently have it, that our Heavenly Father heal them."

Similarly, New Jersey priest Fr. Anthony Manuppella earlier last month took Christ's Real Presence and a statue of the Mother of God on a two-hour trip over his diocese of Camden to halt the pandemic and to heal its victims.

And around the world, a Polish priest also took to the skies with the Blessed Sacrament and a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary to protect his countrymen from the pandemic.

Finally, it seems to have been a Lebanese priest who started all this last month by flying with Jesus over his country, pleading with Our Eucharistic Lord to protect his country from the virus.

So far the Wuhan virus in Lebanon has attacked less than 500 victims.

Various Catholics on social media are now wondering if the current plague is God's way of ending sins such as abortion and idolatry, or perhaps a way to wake man up to them.

If that's true — and no one knows for certain — it seems Christ's first acts of healing would be more spiritual than physical.

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