Man Sues Parents for Trashing His Porn Collection

News: US News
by David Nussman  •  ChurchMilitant.com  •  April 17, 2019   

Plaintiff sues parents for destroying $29,000 stash of pornography; parents said they did it for his 'mental and emotional health'

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GRAND HAVEN, Mich. (ChurchMilitant.com) - A man is now suing his parents for destroying his massive stash of pornography.

The 40-year-old Indiana resident identified in reports only as "Charlie" filed a lawsuit against his parents last week, claiming they destroyed his collection of pornographic videos and other items.

Charlie moved in with his parents in Grand Haven, Michigan in October 2016 after a divorce with his wife. He moved out 10 months later to his own place in Indiana. When his parents drove to his new home to bring his possessions from their house, conspicuously missing were 12 boxes of pornography and two boxes of sex toys.

According to the lawsuit, Charlie's parents destroyed his vast volumes of pornographic materials — which included films themed around bestiality, incest and urination — after he moved back out of the family home.

He is now suing his parents for $90,000 in compensation.


In email exchanges last year, Charlie's dad defended destroying the porn stash, saying in a January 2018 email, "I find your whole attitude toward women to be very disturbing."

He added, "Women are not objects for you to masturbate with, they are people created by God just as you were and should be treated with respect and dignity."

Charlie's dad also wrote, "Believe it or not, one reason for why I destroyed your porn was for your own mental and emotional health. I would have done the same if I had found a kilo of crack cocaine. Someday, I hope you will understand."

Studies show that pornography use affects the viewer's brain similarly to the way addictive substances affect a drug addict's brain.

Believe it or not, one reason for why I destroyed your porn was for your own mental and emotional health. I would have done the same if I had found a kilo of crack cocaine.

The defendant reminded Charlie via email how he was kicked out of high school for distributing pornography to fellow students, including minors. Charlie was also booted from a religiously affiliated college for selling pornographic materials around campus.

The lawsuit contains an itemized list of the objects that were destroyed, including the exact titles of videos and the brand names of sex toys. The list runs for about 17 pages.

The estimated value of Charlie's porn collection is nearly $29,000. His collection included rare pornographic VHS tapes and other old, hard-to-find materials.

Charlie reached out to law enforcement about what his parents did, complaining that they destroyed his private property. But officials said there was not sufficient evidence to prosecute.

In a March 2018 email to his parents, Charlie wrote, "If you had a problem with my belongings, you should have stated that at the time and I would have gone elsewhere. Instead you choose [sic] to keep quiet and behave vindictively."

Charlie also argued, "I am glad about the person I am. ... I collect porn to remind me that I'm not you. I'm me. I have thoughts and feelings too. Sad sad thoughts [sic]. Angry thoughts! But human, so human."

Pornography, the Catholic Church teaches, is a grave violation of chastity and contradicts the dignity of the human person. The Catechism of the Catholic Church states that porn "offends against chastity because it perverts the conjugal act, the intimate giving of spouses to each other."

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The Catechism continues, "It does grave injury to the dignity of its participants (actors, vendors, the public), since each one becomes an object of base pleasure and illicit profit for others. It immerses all who are involved in the illusion of a fantasy world. It is a grave offense."

It further states, "Civil authorities should prevent the production and distribution of pornographic materials."

Nowadays, pornography is often accessed online — making porn addiction a widespread epidemic in Western countries.

With the dawn of smartphones, laptops and tablets, even many children are viewing pornography, often habitually. The average age of first exposure to pornography is 11 years old, according to studies.

In 2007, a University of Alberta study surveyed children ages 13–14 about sexually explicit online content. It found that 90% of boys and 70% of girls admitted accessing pornographic media on at least one occasion. Thirty-five percent of the boys surveyed said they had viewed pornographic videos too many times to count.

Numerous Catholic apostolates and other organizations have emerged in recent years to help people combat porn addiction: Integrity Restored, Covenant Eyes and Fight the New Drug, to name a few.

Pornography use harms marriage. About 56% of divorces involve a spouse visiting porn sites obsessively.

A 2010 study found that 88% of pornographic scenes include physical aggression by males against females. Studies also indicate that people who view these scenes tend to become desensitized to aggression and violence.

In the face of numerous studies and statistics, many in the secular world are waking up to the ill effects of pornography on individuals and on society at large. Lawmakers in about a dozen states have passed resolutions declaring pornography a public health crisis.

 

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